Vitamin A Deficiency Linked to Type 2 Diabetes | Life Line Screening

Vitamin A Deficiency Linked to Type 2 Diabetes


Joelle Reizes

Type 2 diabetes affects over 29 million Americans, according to the American Diabetes Association, and it accounts for almost 95% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes in the United States.

Type 2 diabetes develops when insulin-producing cells in the body are unable to produce enough insulin, or when any insulin that is produced, fails to work properly.

Although a healthy diet, regular exercise, and medication are often used to treat type 2 diabetes, a new study published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry has found a potential link between vitamin A deficiency and the onset of type 2 diabetes.

Vitamin A

Vitamin A strengthens immunity against infections and aids in the growth of cells, along with helping maintain and improve vision. Vitamin A also boosts beta cell activity. Beta cells produce and secrete insulin, a hormone that regulates levels of glucose in the blood. Research found, significant beta cell loss, resulted in the reduction of insulin production and increased blood glucose levels � key factors involved in development of type 2 diabetes. It is for this reason Dr. Lorraine Gudas, the primary author in the recent study, suggests a lack of the vitamin may play a role in the development of type 2 diabetes. In conclusion, make sure to eat foods high in vitamin A so you do not become vitamin A deficient!

Foods High in Vitamin A

Good sources of vitamin A include cheese, eggs, yogurt, and liver. You can also make sure you have enough vitamin A by including good sources of beta-carotene in your diet. Add a few of these foods to your next grocery list:

  • Sweet potatoes
  • Carrots
  • Spinach
  • Kale
  • Mustard Greens
  • Collard Greens
  • Winter Squash
  • Swiss Chard
  • Type 2 Diabetes Prevention

    When it comes to type 2 diabetes, the goal is always prevention. With diabetes affecting more than 26 million Americans and quickly growing, it's more important than ever to know your personal risk factors:

  • Family History
  • Race (African Americans, Hispanics, Pacific Islanders, American Indians, Alaska Natives and Asian Americans are at an increased risk)
  • Being Overweight
  • Physical Inactivity
  • Low HDL cholesterol
  • High blood pressure
  • Abnormal fasting glucose screening results
  • If you have any of these risk factors, or are above the age of 45, it is recommended that you have a blood glucose screeningonce every three years.

    Health Education Articles

    Explore our library to stay on top of the latest trends, research, and helpful guidance based on your health needs.

    Healthy Living

    Stay informed on changes to everyday living that have a big impact on long-term health.

    Diet & Nutrition

    Get healthy recipes and advice proven to reduce risk of serious illnesses.

    Disease Information

    Discover the latest research about health issues often addressed by our services.